Soyuz rocket hit by engine problem after blast-off, astronauts safe: Russian agencies

Soyuz-FG rocket booster blasts off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome carrying the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft with Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Hague of the ISS Expedition 57/58 prime crew aboard to the International Space Station (IS

U.S., Russian Space Crew Heading Back To Earth After Booster Failure

An incident took place during the October 11 launch of a Soyuz spacecraft carrying two men to the International Space Station, with the status of the spacecraft and crew now unknown.

The Soyuz MS-10 rocket had four boosters strapped to its central core.

They were to dock at the International Space Station six hours later, but the booster suffered engine failure minutes after the launch.

NASA says that two astronauts from the USA and Russian Federation are in good condition after an emergency landing following booster rocket failure minutes after the launch. No information about the projected landing location or status of the crew were immediately available. Search and rescue crews are heading to the landing site.

The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying the crew of astronaut Nick Hague of the USA and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of Russian Federation blasts off to the International Space Station (ISS) from the launchpad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan October 11, 2018. The current Soyuz on the ISS, Soyus MS-09, launched in June and has an orbital lifetime of about 200 days.

"Shortly after launch, there was an issue with the booster".

Both astronauts were said to be "alive" on Thursday morning, but their exact condition is not known - according to local Russian report.

Ovchinin, 47, is a major in the Russian Air Force who made his first spaceflight in 2016.

A USA astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut are alive after a failure during a mission to the International Space Station.

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