Former Cambridge Analytica boss to appear before British lawmakers on June 6

WASHINGTON DC- APRIL 11 Facebook co-founder Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill

Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg answers questions

The EU meeting however is set to be private with the leaders of the political groups and a justice and civil rights expert.

FACEBOOK chief Mark Zuckerberg has agreed to meet European Members of Parliament (MEPs) behind closed doors to answer questions in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, a top official said on Wednesday.

The revelations that the data of some 87 million Facebook users and their friends may have been misused by the consulting firm that worked on Donald Trump's US presidential campaign, has been called a game changer in the world of data protection as regulators seek to raise awareness about how to secure information. Many in the European Parliament had been calling for a public hearing.

Facebook, in an emailed statement, said it accepted the "proposal to meet with leaders of the European Parliament and appreciate the opportunity for dialog, to listen to their views and show the steps we are taking to better protect people's privacy".

Tajani said: "Our citizens deserve a full and detailed explanation".

It is a "snub to the United Kingdom and the millions of Facebook users in the United Kingdom who deserve answers", the tweet read.

He might get tougher questions in Brussels, where an assertive new European data protection law comes into effect on May 25.

"I will not attend the meeting with Mr Zuckerberg if it's held behind closed doors. It must be a public hearing - why not a Facebook Live?" influential Belgian MEP Guy Verhofstadt wrote on Twitter.

Zuckerberg's European Union visit will be his first since a whistleblower alleged that Cambridge Analytica improperly harvested information from over 50 million Facebook accounts to help Donald Trump win the 2016 presidential election.

A DCMS committee spokesperson confirmed no formal summons has been issued to Zuckerberg to date, although Vote Leave campaign director Dominic Cummings, and former Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix - both embroiled in the burgeoning scandal over the alleged misuse of data in political campaigns - were subject to formal summons.

The 40-page letter, in response to the committee's formal request for Facebook to respond to 39 points it felt Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer answer answered unsatisfactorily last month when he appeared before MPs, arrived three days after an initial 11 May deadline - with Facebook requesting, and being granted, an extension.

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