Saudi Arabia intercepts ballistic missile

Houthi militants

GETTYHouthi militants have been fighting in Yemen since 2015

Spokesman of the coalition forces in support of legitimacy in Yemen, Colonel Turki Saleh Al Maliki said that 16 air, sea and land relief outlets in Yemen are open to global organisations and donor countries to receive aid and enter the Yemeni territories.

Tribesmen loyal to the Houthi movement hold their weapons as they attend a gathering to mark 1000 days of the Saudi-led military intervention in the Yemeni conflict, in Sanaa, Yemen December 21, 2017.

A coalition statement released later by the official Saudi Press Agency said the warplane that crashed was Saudi and that the operation to rescue the crew involved ground forces.

Yemen lies beside the southern mouth of the Red Sea, one of the most important trade routes in the world for oil tankers, which pass near Yemen's shores while heading from the Middle East through the Suez Canal to Europe.

Saudi air defenses on Thursday intercepted a "ballistic missile" fired by Yemen's Houthi militia group towards the Saudi city of Najran near the Saudi-Yemen border, Saudi news broadcaster Al-Arabiya has reported.

Last Friday, social networking sites shared a number of pictures of an intercepted Houthi missile in the Najran area.

Already one of the Arab world's poorest countries, Yemen has been brought to its knees since the Saudi-led coalition intervened in March 2015 in support of the government.

Al-Maliki continued to say the Houthis are using the port of Hudaydah as a means for "smuggling advanced weaponry, but also as a launch pad for attacks on global ships".

The war has killed more than 10,000 Yemenis, mostly civilians, and pushed the country to the brink of mass starvation.

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