Clinton Foundation donors could have money clawed back by government: Judge Napolitano

Clinton Foundation donors could have money clawed back by government: Judge Napolitano

Clinton Foundation donors could have money clawed back by government: Judge Napolitano

Claims linking Hillary Clinton to corruption resurfaced in Washington on Friday as it was reported that the Federal Bureau of Investigation was looking into her charitable foundation and the Justice department was looking into her email server.

According to the Hill, FBI agents interviewed at least one witness in the past month and will likely take further action in the coming weeks as officials examine whether the Clintons took part in any pay-to-play schemes, possibly promising political favors in exchange for foundation donations.

Late a year ago, Attorney General Jeff Sessions told prosecutors to evaluate "certain issues" raised by congressional Republicans concerning alleged unlawful dealings related to the Clinton Foundation, leading to speculation about the potential appointment of another special counsel.

Trump has, via Twitter and in speeches, repeatedly called for the Justice Department to reopen a probe into the private email server of Hillary Clinton, whom he defeated in the 2016 presidential election.

A spokesman for the foundation, Craig Minassian, said it had been "subjected to politically motivated allegations, and time after time these allegations have proven false".

Republican lawmakers had called on Attorney General Jeff Sessions in July and again in September to explore various Clinton Foundation dealings, as well as other matters, by appointing a special counsel to look into Clinton-related issues.

Fox News senior judicial analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano on Friday said some Clinton Foundation donors could be in jeopardy for taking tax breaks that the Clinton Foundation wasn't allowed to register.

Nick Merrill, a spokesman for Hillary Clinton, told The Hill that the probe was "a sham" and said Sessions was "doing Trump's bidding" by pursuing the case. It began with a now long-debunked project spearheaded by Steve Bannon during the presidential campaign. But, because of its global donor base and Hillary Clinton's former position as America's top diplomat, it also faced questions about contributions from countries such as Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Algeria.

LiAngelo Ball Gets Asked On Date By Lithuanian Reporter
State lawmakers expected in new session to debate legalizing pot