Facebook asks users to upload nudes to fight revenge porn

Facebook suggests users upload nudes to avoid revenge porn

Facebook asks users to upload nudes to fight revenge porn

However, a May report indicated that the social network was "flooded" with cases of revenge porn and sextortion, with almost 54,000 cases of the crime reported in just a month; 33 of which involved children. CNBC reports Facebook's anti-revenge porn pilot program is available in the USA, U.K., and Canada. Next, they will be asked to send the images to themselves on Messenger.

Facebook has come up with an unusual method of tackling the menace of revenge porn, one that might even seem insane as well. Individuals who want to take part in the trial must first file a report with the commissioner.

But can you trust Facebook?

The photos are then processed so Facebook's photo and face-matching algorithms can identify the photos if someone else tries to post them, and then block them.

The company hopes that taking preemptive action will provide better security than deleting an image after it's been reported, which at that point might be too late.

There are laws against revenge porn, but the scourge is hard to fight against in practical terms.

But the real question is - who is ready to share their nudes with Facebook?

Two years ago, Twitter and Reddit cracked down on revenge porn, banning the practice on both platforms.

What does Facebook do with the photos?

For Facebook, revenge porn is a big issue. Each month, the company sees 54,000 leaked documents like nude photos.

If you've ever handled an explicit picture, chances are it sent was using WhatsApp, a Facebook-owned company, or Snapchat.

Facebook can use technology to "hash" nude images, which means Facebook creates a traceable digital fingerprint or link. "Of course, we always encourage people to be very careful about where they store intimate photos and preferably to not store them online in any form". If the same photo is uploaded then it will thwart the same and prevent it from distribution. No one can decode it to re-create the photos either. Facebook knows that there will be many people concerned about how it handles such sensitive content, and I imagine they have put a good deal of thought into minimising the chances that anything goes wrong. Wink tipped, so to speak, Facebook will create the hash for each image without storing the pic itself, and definitely not using it to start some sort of dinkle gallery channel on Sky.

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