'Don't Touch My Hair' singer Solange Knowles cross as hair touched

CREDIT YouTube

CREDIT YouTube

She then posted parts of the interview where she is quoted as saying that braiding is an "act of beauty, an act of convenience and an act of tradition - its own art form". One of the more personal tracks of Solo's Grammy-winning album, A Seat At The Table, was "Don't Touch My Hair", a song that attempts to tackle the complex and deep relationship black women have with their hair.

ES Magazine has apologised to Solange Knowles over an image of the singer on its cover.

Despite writing a whole song on the topic, Solange Knowles had to remind the London Evening Standard to not touch her hair.

"Braiding is important to Knowles".

Adorned in intricate braids by Joanne Petit-Frére and Vernon Francois (who also works with Lupita Nyong'o), the Houston native sat down for a revealing interview, where she emphasized her love for the hairstyle and what it's meant to her journey as a Black woman.

Yesterday, we told you about the conversation she had with the United Kingdom publication about how owning her body was so important to her this past year. In true Solange fashion, she made her discontent known via social media.

"I want to navigate through that ownership of my body in the most authentic way".

"Don't touch my hair, when it's the feelings I wear". Meanwhile, white supermodels get to stalk down high fashion runways with rainbow dreadlocks as magazines respond with headlines fawning over how "edgy" and "innovative" they look. "The crown was the whole objective of the complete look!" It appears the rest of the hairstyle was edited out to make room so the image would better fit on the cover. But apparently her crown was a bit too much for some. "She could've been seated to display it!" an angry fan mentioned. Watch the video below to see the controversial cover. Despite the statement-making style, the mag cover shows no such trace of anything above Solange's scalp.

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