What happened in Bill Cosby's sexual-assault trial

Cosby Admission Read in Court: 'My God, I'm in Trouble'

Cosby jurors hear his worry about being seen as 'dirty old man'

Cosby, who claimed the sexual contact with Constand was consensual, testified in the deposition he began touching Constand and that Constand did not stop him. He contends the sexual encounter was consensual. At one point, he turned away from the witness stand toward the audience. The defense starts its case on Monday. He waved from the back of an SUV with its window half down. She wanted to know what medication he had given Andrea Constand that incapacitated her. At the time of the incident, Constand was 31, Cosby 66. If convicted, Cosby could spend the rest of his life in prison.

Cosby lawyer Brian McMonagle showed jurors a Facebook post after Cosby's case was bound over for trial in which Valliere wrote, "Victory!"

Friday's prosecution witness was Dr. Veronique Valliere, an expert on the behavior of sexual assault victims. There's still a chance Cosby could testify at the trial.

"You're biased in this case, aren't you?' McMonagle asked her".

In the deposition, he admits giving quaaludes before sex in 1976 to one of his approximately 60 accusers.

That, in turn, spurred Pennsylvania prosecutors to reopen their investigation of Cosby and arrest him a decade after the district attorney at the time decided the case was too weak to prosecute.

The defence is expected to present its case next week.

The spokesman, Andrew Wyatt, said some members of Cosby's family will join him in court as the trial wears on.

Cosby testified in the deposition that he never believed Constand or her mother were after his money. What did she say about that night?

When she asked if they were herbal, he nodded, she told jurors.

According to USA Today, prosecutors asked Valliere - who has treated both victims and assailants - a series of hypothetical questions about a victim whose attacker is well-liked and respected in the workplace.

Mr Cosby said in a previous police interview that he used Benadryl as a sleep aid, and that he becomes drowsy and falls asleep shortly after taking them.

Valliere said it's not unusual for victims to reach out to their assailant after the alleged attack because they may be confused and are looking to get a "sense of clarity".

"If it's a well-known person, the victim takes on a lot of responsibility for that person's reputation". It's unclear whether Cosby's compromised vision allows him to see either the audience or the jury, but his movements were noticeable, even more so than this morning when a detective read portions of a statement that seemed to have made him uncomfortable.

In January 2004, Ms. Constand said, Mr. Cosby invited her to his house again to discuss her career options.

In the deposition, he recounted a telephone conversation he had with Constand's mother.

But if Cosby testifies, prosecutors could be permitted to call other accusers to rebut Cosby's testimony, said lawyer Joseph Amendola.

Cosby leaves the courtroom for a break during the fifth day of his sexual assault trial.

Prosecutors have suggested he drugged her with something stronger, perhaps the quaaludes he admitted obtaining decades ago. I'm frightened because when I'm saying something Andrea's mother jumps and says, 'What does that mean?

James Reape, a detective of the Montgomery County Detective Bureau's major crimes unit who took the stand late Thursday afternoon, returned to testify twice on Friday.

Cosby insists in the deposition that the seven prescriptions for Quaaludes he received from a now-deceased Los Angeles doctor were for an injury for his back, but the physician knew that's not what Cosby was going to use them for.

But the 44-year-old Constand brushed aside the broadsides like a courtroom pro, the Philadelphia Daily News reports.

"We have expectations that are misguided about how people respond to traumatic events, especially sexual assault".

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