Evacuation ordered for Oroville as dam spillway expected to fail

Crews prepare to seal California dam spillway that forced evacuations

Evacuation Order Still in Effect Until Further Notice

Rain is forecast for later this week in Northern California, and almost 200,000 people who live downstream have been evacuated from the area. This includes an emergency kit, a way to communicate with family members and other proactive steps to be prepared.

The Sacramento Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is opening its doors to pets of Oroville-area residents who have left their homes due to mandatory evacuations.

And just as PG&E has a plan for potential disasters, the energy company urges its customers to do the same.

Spicer did not say whether the president had responded to the request, but the administration is working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Thousands of homes sit abandoned in the Feather River Valley below California's Lake Oroville Dam, as officials race to fix the dam's damaged spillways.

The problems at the dam began last week when a large portion of the main spillway eroded and broke apart, whereupon authorities closed that spillway and opened the emergency spillway for the first time in the dam's history. Evacuations remain in place.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will give an update on the Isabella Lake Dam Safety Modifications Project to Kern County Supervisors Tuesday afternoon. Although the level of the dam's lake is falling fast, more rain is forecast.

City personnel inspect San Diego's dams on a weekly basis for things such as erosion, leaks or anything that could compromise the integrity of a dam or spillway, such as brush and tree growth, rodent holes and fallen boulders; cracks are measured monthly, according to the Public Utilities Department.

Instead, once the reservoir reached its full capacity, water slowly began spilling over the emergency spillway, reports KCRA.

"There has been severe erosion of the emergency spillway and a possible structural breach that could send uncontrolled water down the stream", said Chris Orrock, a spokesman with the California Department of Water Resources.

"Many of our hydraulic structures are likely under designed", Webster says, citing the outdated methods for sizing dams in the era of Oroville and expected increases in extreme weather. In those guidelines, he said Monday, "they talk about how you don't put a lot of funding and concrete, etc. into emergency spillways because presumably they will rarely if ever be used".

Department of Water Resources Acting Director Bill Croyle told California Gov.

"The situation is a textbook example of why we need to pursue a major infrastructure package in Congress", White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Tuesday during a press briefing.

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